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Hollandaise sauce

Hollandaise sauce

New school Hollandaise (FOOL PROOF...)

For this method, you will need a jug and a stick blender. (If you’re a hollandaise addict, you will want to invest in one).

Unlike traditional hollandaise, you DO NOT need to clarify your butter. That is, to remove the milk solids over a lengthy process). So therefore, no butter wasted.

Hollandaise is ALWAYS best when eaten with an hour or so. The sooner the better. All that butter can set inside the sauce, leaving you with an overly thick consistency, which tends to split when you heat it. So once made, store it somewhere warm but not hot!

Ingredients 

300g Butter unsalted

3 egg yolks

150mls chardonnay or champagne vinegar.

5 Australian or French black peppercorns

1 fresh bay leaf (two if dried)

1 sprig of tarragon (optional, and certainly not traditional)

Salt and white pepper.

Method

  1. Place the vinegar, pepper, bay leaf, and tarragon into a small sauce pot and bring to a simmer and cook until 1/3 of the original volume. Just do this by eye, no need to measure
  2. Once it has reduced, strain. Leave till room temp or warm to touch. (Can make reduction hours/days before if needed)
  3. Place butter in a sauce pot over medium heat. Allow to melt and bring to a vigorous boil but be sure not to boil for too long, we don’t want noisette (or worse, to burn it).
  4. Meanwhile, place yolks in the bottom of a jug, and have your immersion blender ready.
  5. Once butter has boiled, turn off. Working quickly, add approx. 20mls of the reduction to the egg yolks, and blend as best you can. (The liquid will be low at this point, so do your best to work the yolks with the vinegar)
  6. Slowly pour the hot butter into the jug with the blender running. Mixing well as you work. The sauce will begin to thicken. The thicker it gets, the harder it will be to get all of the butter in. If it starts to thicken too much, add a little more vinegar or hot water.
  7. You may not use all of the butter, but you should at least use 2/3rds.
  8. Your sauce will have a wonderful sheen, with a rich buttery texture. The sauce should be warm, but not hot at this point.
  9. Season with salt and pepper. Store till ready to serve in a warm spot
TIP: To store until serving, place a layer of cling film on the surface of the sauce. This will prevent a skin forming, and ensure you keep your silky-smooth consistency.

 

NOTE: Your vinegar reduction, along with hot water, will be your friend in adjusting consistency. Adding liquid (that isn’t melted butter will thin your sauce, whilst more butter will thicken it). As you add your butter, don’t be afraid to add a tsp of hot water here and there, if the sauce thickens too quickly)

AND ANOTHER NOTE: To balance acidity and richness think this: Butter will mellow the vinegar and vinegar will cut through the buttery fat. So, balance this as best you can. Start with the 20mls and see how you go.

 

Traditional Hollandaise (NOT FOOL PROOF...)

Ingredients

350g Butter unsalted

3 egg yolks

150mls chardonnay or champagne vinegar.

5 Australian or French black peppercorns

1 fresh bay leaf (two if dried)

1 sprig of tarragon (optional, and certainly not traditional)

Salt and white pepper.

Method

  1. Place butter in a heat proof over a pot of simmering water. Leave until butter has melted and split. You will see a clear division between butter fat and milk solids. Allow the milk solids to settle on the bottom. Skim the butter fat from the top. This is clarified butter. Remove and leave the simmering water on the stove for later.
  2. Place the vinegar, pepper, bay leaf, and tarragon into a small sauce pot and bring to a simmer and cook until 1/3 of the original volume. Just do this by eye, no need to measure.  Once reduced, strain. Leave till room temp or warm to touch. (Can make reduction hours/days before if needed)
  3. Place yolks in a clean bowl, add 20mls (ish) of the reduction and whisk together. 
  4. Place this bowl over the pot of simmering water, turn down to a very low simmer  and try to avoid getting the yolk up the sides of the bowl, as it will cook there, and make lumpy sauce.
  5. Continuously to whisk vigorously and be sure to get every part of the egg with the whisk. and continue to whisk until you reach sabayon stage. This is tested by pulling the whisk out of the mixture, and drawing a figure of 8. If the mixture holds the figure well, you are ready to go - be aware, if you go too far, you will overcook your yolks, essentially making vinegary scrambled eggs. 
  6. Now slowly add your warm clarified butter in a thin stream whilst whisking. See notes in recipe above in regards to thickness and control.
  7. Season with salt and white pepper.
  8. Remember to balance your acid and fat. See recipe above for tips.
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